Monday, June 14, 2010

Knitting continues

I'm trying to alternate knitting posts with the processing-type posts (still doing a lot of processing from last week). I am actually knitting, so it seems like this just might be the place to share it, right?

In particular, I've been working on the Tibetan Clouds beaded stole, and I promised that when I got done with the middle panel and prepared to move on to the "wings", I'd show how that goes, so here it is.

The middle panel is knitted in the round, with increases at each of four corners, resulting (if all goes well) in a square. When I got done with all of the charts for that section, it looked something like this.
A giant blob. It was rather unsatisfying to try to see what was going on with it by this stage, as it looked something like a jellyfish.
(from the underside)

So the next step was to bind off the stitches along one side of the square, resulting in this (the bound-off edge is at the top there).
Then, I knit across the next side of the square, putting the stitches on an extra needle to be held in reserve, resulting in this (first bound off edge on the right, stitches held in reserve on top):
I then bound off the third side, and knitted across the fourth side, and ended up with a square, bound off on two sides (the top and bottom), and with stitches all ready to go on the other two sides (I will now knit back and forth from each of those in turn, to create the long "wings" of the stole).
I don't know if that's clarified anything, but I hope so. From now on, I'll be able to pet and admire the stole more easily as I go, as it can be spread out. This one is time-consuming, because of the beads, but the yarn is absolutely amazing to work with (I truly adore this yarn; silk and merino have to be one of the best fiber marriages in the world), and the results are making me so happy that I don't mind that it's taking a while.
(If you click to embiggen, I think you can see the beads on that one). It's just as well that I don't mind, because in the meantime, I went knitting at my LYS last week, and I appear to have started another stole. Oops.
It's actually much further along than that by now. There's a small part of me that would really like to finish it in time to wear it out to dinner for Rick's birthday on Friday night. The finishing on this one is easy; it's linen, so instead of blocking, it is, quite literally, wash and wear. This makes it marginally less impossible to finish in time than it would be if I had to finish knitting it with time to spare to soak and block it and then wait for it to dry before going out. It may still be a pipe dream, but hey, if it's not done, what's the worst that happens? I'll just have to wear Artichaut, or something, no?

In the meantime, I get to take one of my favorite young people (the daughter of a dear friend of mine) to my LYS tomorrow to teach her how to knit. I absolutely can't wait; I've been trying to arrange this for a while (such a converter, I am). So, any suggestions for a good first project for a 15-year-old? I think in the end that she might end up enjoying one of those beaded bracelets I was obsessed with some time ago, but I'm not sure that's a good first project, as it's a bit fiddly. Maybe the beaded tam, instead?
What first projects do you all use that will neither a) bore your student to tears, nor b) frustrate them to the point of giving up? Balance in all things...

21 comments:

Willow said...

Oooo! Linen! Sweet! Details, please!

I agree that silk and merino are a match made in fiber heaven.

KnitNana said...

Oh my what is that blue shawl? You did not identify!
Tibetan Clouds looks lovely, and yes, for me, at least, your explanation clarified what you were up to.

Tam? Where did that come from? Did I miss the post on that one?

Good luck tomorrow...not sure I'd teach a beaded cuff for the first thing!
(((hugs)))

Mary said...

Maybe have her knit garter stitch sideways handwarmers? Cast on about 8" of stitches, knit long enough to go around the hand and wrist, cast off and sew the bind off to the cast on, leaving a slit for the thumb? Particularly thrilling in something like Kureyon or Boku.

Anonymous said...

Grandma's Favorite Dishcloth? Or a smallish rectangle that can become a small bag with the addition of a strap? Handwarmers (knit flat)? A simple beanie? Something pretty basic, to start, and not too big!

twinsetellen said...

The cloud stole is so lovely - I'm so glad to see it spreading its literal and metaphoric wings.

First project - iPod or cell case (seamed rectangle). You only have to make one, so you don't deal with newbie gauge change on the second handwarmer. But second project - that could be handwarmers!

I do like simple hats, too, as they teach decreasing and dpns.

A Bitter Knitter said...

Love, love, LOVE the stole. Emphatically.

I like the beaded tam...

I originally learned to knit by doing rows and rows of 2x2 ribbing (flat)that was supposed to turn into a beanie & never did, because it fell into category "a". My first re-learning project was a pair of fingerless gloves (knit in the round), and my second was a slouchy beret.

Miss 376 said...

Both those stoles look gorgeous. You have four days until Friday, lol. I can't even remember what I knitted when I started. I know I used to have fun making dishcloths, I used to make up patterns on them, lol

FUZZARELLY said...

Knitting and processing. Me too. That Tibetan stole is beautiful!

Elizabeth said...

I was thinking an ipod cozy would be a good first project - quick, easy and useful. But mostly I want to say NOT a scarf. My first project was a scarf and it took me 2 years to finish because it bored me to tears. I can say I learned to knit by the time it was finished, but it took some dedication (and the fact that I had promised to give it to my mother for her birthday) to finally finish it. That and all the knitting books I was collecting, calling me to learn more knitting tricks. It's a wonder I didn't just start another project!

elizabeth said...

I'm a big fan of a hat as a first project - it's fast, it's knit in the round so she can concentrate on her knit stitch only, and she'll learn decreases!

The stole is going to be gorgeous!

Alwen said...

I can't wait to see how Tibetan Clouds comes out. There are a couple of oval Niebling lace patterns that are worked out in a similar way.

EGunn said...

Beautiful! I love, love, love the brown, and the beads add wonderful little sparkles.

As for the student, I have no ideas. My only convert was a 6-year-old who came with her own needles and acrylic yarn. She's probably still working on the garter stitch scarf. In that case, though, the aim was more to plant a seed than to instill a passion. 15 is a much more promising age...

Mary Lou said...

I agree that a scarf is a terrible first project, as the student tends to die of boredom. I usually go with a hat in the round in chunky, but in San Diego, that might not be very practical. Felted bag? Felting hides all the mistakes, which gives encouragement for the next project.

Rachel said...

What is that gorgeous new stole? I endlessly love the color, more details please :)

The Tibetan Clouds looks promising, waiting patiently to see it all blocked and elegant.

I wouldn't include beads in a first object but who knows with today's youngsters. Sam started with the good old boring scarf. A colorful yarn can make it not so boring.

Rachael said...

Oh Joce, that brown for the tibetan clouds is just luscious, it's going to be amazing!

Helen said...

The Tibetan Clouds is (are?) heavenly. I'm doing so much vanilla knitting just now, I can't wait to have an octopus on my knee again.

Carrie #K said...

The stole is lovely. That pattern is fabulous.

I'm hopeless at firsts. I think she should knit what she wants but sometimes that can be frustrating. OTOH, process comes and product counts.

Carrie #K said...

The stole is lovely. That pattern is fabulous.

I'm hopeless at firsts. I think she should knit what she wants but sometimes that can be frustrating. OTOH, process comes and product counts.

Lynne said...

Ah jelly fish! They eventually become so much more exciting; I love the magic of blocking!

Hope you get the linen stole finished in time for Rick's birthday.

DD part-taught someone to knit the other day - she will knit a blanket square and we will incorporate it into other blanket squares. The finished afghan will got to charity.

Gwen said...

Oops! That's a good oops. They both look absolutely lovely. And useful during the processing.

Bea said...

Even as a giant blob your shawl is looking great.